Category Archives: Hong Kong

Diamond Services reports a lowering threshold for synthetic diamonds, as man-made stones as small as 0.0025 cts. discovered in New York

Barely visible on the electronic scale, these tiny single-cut diamonds were discovered by Diamond Services to be laboratory grown.

HONG KONG: JULY 11, 2017 – Multiple single-cut diamonds, sized from a quarter point to half a point (0.0025-0.005 carats), which were contained in jewellery recently submitted for testing to a Diamond Services laboratory, have been found to be synthetic, greatly expanding the range of goods that can be considered at risk of improper and deceptive disclosure.

The jewellery in question was originally submitted to Diamond Services’ laboratory in New York, and after several stones were detected as being potentially laboratory grown. Due to their size, the owner agreed that 11 of them set in eight rings, ranging in size from 0.0025 carats to 0.005 carats, could be removed and sent for full analysis at Diamond Services’ facility in Hong Kong. There they were examined once again with Diamond Services’ award-winning DiamaTest system, which ratified that the diamonds were synthetic, and these findings were confirmed by examination with the DiamondView system of De Beers’ International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR) and Diamond Services Mini Raman Spectrometer.

Usually restricted to smaller-sized stones, single-cut diamonds typically have 17 or 18 facets, and some as few as 16, compared to the standard brilliant round cuts, which are made up of the 57 or 58 facets. Most round stones are first polished as single cuts, and then the additional facets are added. But when small stones are concerned, they are left as single cuts.

“To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that a synthetic single-cut stone has been detected mounted in jewelry, and it is a credit to our Diamond Services procedures and set of equipment,” said Jospeh Kuzi, Diamond Services founder and managing director. “What this means is that almost no diamond can be taken at face value.”

The source of the single-cut synthetics is not immediately apparent, but Kuzi noted that the growing availability of CVD man-made diamond may prove to be a factor. “CVD is being widely in areas outside the diamond industry, and now includes diamond wafers being gown in laboratories for use in the electronics industry. It could be that waste from these labs and factories end up being processed as very small single-cut diamonds for jewellery,” he said.

Diamonds submitted for synthetic screening at Diamond Services facilities are tested using several systems, including the DiamaTest and Mini Raman Spectrometer, both of which was developed by the company. The latter is the only system currently available that can definitely test rough and polished diamonds, both mounted and un-mounted, without the need to refer them for further testing, accurately detecting whether they are HPHT or CVD lab-grown synthetics within seconds.

Diamond Services, which was established in 2012 in Hong Kong, specializes in development of synthetic diamond detection devices. In 2013 it first introduced the DiamaPen®, a hand-held laser device that is able to detect fancy colour synthetic diamonds. In 2014 it introduced DiamaTest®, an innovative system that screens both loose and colourless diamonds for synthetics, for which it won the prestigious JNA 2014 Award. The Mini Raman Spectrometer was introduced to the market in 2015.

Diamond Services synthetic screening services are currently available at the company’s headquarters in Hong Kong (19F Shing Lee Comm. Bldg., 8 Wing Kut St., Central, Hong Kong, tel: +1-852-2536-4555); and in the United States (15W, 47th St., Suite #1404, New York City, tel: +1-844-842-8122).

www.scamsfakes.com

Henry Sapiecha

Pink Star diamond sets new world auction price record in Hong Kong

 

A rare diamond known as the Pink Star has been sold in Hong Kong for more than $71m (£57m), setting a new world record for any gemstone at auction.

The oval-shaped 59.6 carat stone was bought after just five minutes’ bidding at Sotheby’s, reports said.

It is the largest polished diamond in its class to go under the hammer.

It sold for $83m in Geneva in 2013 but the buyer later defaulted. The record until now was held by the Oppenheimer Blue, which sold for $50m last May.

Bidding for the gem, which was found by De Beers at a mine in Africa in 1999 and cut over a period of two years, began at $56m.

Sotheby’s said the buyer was Hong Kong jewellery retailer Chow Tai Fook Jewellery.

Alexander Breckner, head of diamonds at jewellers “77 Diamonds”, told the BBC that the stone was exceptional.

“It’s the largest pink diamond ever found in the history of humankind. It’s an incredible colour to it.

“And the sheer size of the stone already makes it so rare and so beautiful.”

Previous records set in stone

May 2016: A large diamond known as the Oppenheimer Blue set a new auction record, reaching a price of $50.6m (£34.7m at the exchange rate then current). The 14.62-carat gem was sold after 20 minutes of phone bidding at Christie’s auction house in Geneva. The buyer’s identity is unknown.

November 2015: The Blue Moon, a 12.03-carat ring-mounted blue diamond, caught the eye of Hong Kong tycoon Joseph Lau, who paid a record $48.4m (£31.7m) for the cushion-shaped stone. He bought it for his seven-year-old daughter, renaming it the “Blue Moon of Josephine” after her.

May 2015: An unnamed buyer made history after purchasing the Sunrise Ruby, a 25.59-carat “pigeon blood” coloured gemstone, for $30m (£19.1m). At that price, it became the world’s most expensive precious stone other than a diamond.

November 2013: The “largest vivid orange diamond in the world”, according to Christie’s, attracted the highest price paid per carat for any diamond at auction, selling for $35m (£22m), or $2.4m (£1.5m) per carat.

November 2010: The Graff Pink, a 24.78-carat “fancy intense pink” stone described as “one of the greatest diamonds ever discovered”, auctioned for $46.2m (£29m). At the time it was believed to be the most expensive gemstone bought at auction and was sold to the well-known British dealer Laurence Graff.

Related Topics

www.www-gems.com

www.gem-creations.com

Henry Sapiecha

 

Pink Star diamond smashes the world record sale price at a whopping $71.2 million

pink-star-diamond-breaks-world-record-at-71-2-million image www.worldwidediamonds.info

The largest, most perfect pink diamond to have ever been offered at auction has sold for $71.2 million at a Sotheby’s event Tuesday in Hong Kong, setting a new world record for any diamond or jewel, according to the auction house.

Described as one of “the earth’s greatest natural treasures”, the oval-cut 59.6-carat “Pink Star” is the largest internally flawless pink diamond that the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has ever had the privilege to grade.

Until now, the most expensive diamond ever sold at auction was the “Oppenheimer Blue,” which fetched 56.8 million Swiss francs (more than $57 million at the time) last May. The previous world auction record for a pink diamond was $46.2 million for the 24.78 carat “Graff Pink” in 2010.

First unveiled to the public in 2003, the Pink Star was called the “Steinmetz Pink,” but it was renamed after it was first sold for an undisclosed sum in 2007.

pink-star-hong-kong-71.2m image www.worldwidediamonds.info

The Pink Star is graded as Type IIa, which is rare for any pink diamond, much less one of this size. (Photo: Sotheby’s)

In 2013, the diamond broke a new world record price for a gemstone at auction by fetching $83.2 million in Geneva, way above the $60 million experts had predicted.

Not long after the sale, however, rumours began to spread that the consortium of buyers, led by diamond cutter Isaac Wolf, defaulted on the deal. In February 2014, Sotheby’s confirmed those unofficial reports and said the diamond was again part of its inventory, valued at approximately $72 million.

The Pink Star, originated from a 132.5-carat rough mined by De Beers in 1999 and it’s more than twice the size of the “Graff Pink.”

ADULT STORE

Henry Sapiecha

‘Aurora Green’ diamond smashes records after fetching $16.8 million.Pics & story here.

aurora-green-diamond-smashes-records-after-fetching-16-8-million image www.worldwidediamonds.info

A 5.03-carat fancy vivid green diamond known as “Aurora Green” has set two world auction records for a stone of that colour Tuesday at Christie’s Hong Kong Magnificent Jewels sale, fetching over $16.8 million.

The rectangular-cut fancy rock had been valued at $16 million to $20 million and although it sold at the lower end of that range, it set a “world auction record for a green diamond and world record price per carat for a green diamond,” Christie’s said

aurora-green-diamond-ring image www.worldwidediamods.info

The rectangular-cut fancy diamond had been valued at $16 million to $20 million. (Image courtesy of Christie’s)

The buyer was Hong Kong-based Chow Tai Fook Jewellery, one of the world’s largest jewellery retailers.

The Aurora Green was the top lot of the sale and one of four lots that set world auction records. The sale totalled more than $85 million with 10 lots exceeding more than $1 million. Coloured diamonds, coloured gems and jadeite were among the top lots. A total of 72% of items were sold by lot and 73% by value.

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Henry Sapiecha

De Beers blue diamond smashes sales records in Asia, fetches almost $32M at auction

de-beers-blue-diamond-millenium4 smashes-auction-records-in-asia-fetches-almost-32-million-image www.worldwidediamonds (1)

The “De Beers Millennium Jewel 4” may not have the catchiest name in the history of famous diamonds, but the very rare 10.10-carat blue gem has just broke all auction records in Asia, as it fetched almost $32 million.

The rock, the largest oval fancy vivid blue diamond to ever appear at auction, was auctioned off by Sotheby’s in Hong Kong as part of a high profile gem sale.

de-beers-blue-diamond-millenium4 smashes-auction-records-in-asia-fetches-almost-32-million-image www.worldwidediamonds (2)

The internally flawless diamond was part of the Millennium Jewels collection, unveiled by De Beers in 2000 to commemorate the turn of the century, and displayed at London’s Millennium Dome.

At the time, the blue gem was the target of an attempted multi-million pound robbery in November 2000, which was foiled by the Metropolitan Police.

de-beers-blue-diamond-millenium4 smashes-auction-records-in-asia-fetches-almost-32-million-image www.worldwidediamonds (3)

The auction house will sell another coveted blue diamond, set in a ring once owned by former child star Shirley Temple, on April 19, in the U.S.

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Henry Sapiecha

Hong Kong Tycoon Grabs $48.5Mn Blue Moon Diamond for Daughter at Sotheby’s Auction

Published on Nov 12, 2015

An exceptionally large blue diamond sold Wednesday for 48.6 million Swiss francs ($48.5 million) – a record price for any jewel at auction, Sotheby’s said, culminating two Geneva auctions in which a convicted Hong Kong tycoon, Joseph Lau, bought rare coloured diamonds for his daughter.

Hong-Kong-billionaire-tycoon

The 12.03-carat ‘Blue Moon’ diamond, set in a ring, was said to be among the largest known fancy vivid blue diamonds and was the showpiece gem at the Sotheby’s jewelry auction.

A packed room broke into applause after the hammer came down at a price of 43.2 million Swiss francs, excluding fees – within the pre-auction estimate range of about 34 to 54 million francs.

The Blue Moon – so-called in reference to its rarity, playing off the expression “once in a blue moon” – topped the previous record of $46.2 million set five years ago by the Graff Pink, Sotheby’s said.

The diamond also set a new record of more than $4 million per carat, capping the daylong high-end jewelry sale that reaped roughly $140 million.

Blue diamonds are formed when boron is mixed with carbon when the gem is created.

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Henry Sapiecha

Unknown quantity of diamonds stolen from diamond mine in South Africa + Hong Kong Diamond Necklace worth $4.6m

Undisclosed number of diamonds stolen from South African mine

South African police is searching for sixteen men who stole an undisclosed number of diamonds from a mine near Prieska, Northern Cape, at about 3:40 am Monday.

According to Sapa news agency, the gang tied up security guards and two employees and demanded the safe keys.

Since they were unable to access to the safe, they broke into a room used for sorting the diamonds, running away with an undisclosed number of precious gems, the agency reports.

Undisclosed number of diamonds stolen from South African mine

Also in Hong Kong

On Friday, four people — one of them reportedly a girl between 12 and 14 years old — stole a diamond necklace worth more than $4.6 million in Hong Kong.

The three adults posed as “big spenders” to distract the shop’s employees, an unnamed police source told the South China Morning Post. Meanwhile, the girl grabbed a key to open the cabinet containing the necklace, which was 100-carat gold embedded with more than 30 diamonds, the paper’s source said.

Nobody noticed the necklace was gone until way after the group had left the premises, the paper added.