Category Archives: FAMOUS DIAMONDS

TEN OF THE MOST EXPENSIVE DIAMONDS IN THE WORLD VIDEO PRESENTATION

Worldwide most expensive diamonds

10. The Heart of Eternity ($16 million) The stone that was made into the heart of Eternity Diamond was found at the world’s largest supplier of blue diamonds, the South African Premier Diamond Mine. Blue diamonds are incredibly rare with, on average, only one being found every year, and this one was an amazing find. The rough stone was 777 carats when it was dug up, and the owners waited until they had the perfect design idea before they started cutting it. The result was The Millenium Blue Diamonds- a series of heart, pear drop and oval shaped diamonds of which the Heart Of Eternity is the largest. In recent years it has been on tour at various exhibitions, including at the Millennium exhibition in London in 2000, followed by the Smithsonian museum. It was reportedly bought in 2012 by Floyd Mayweather to give to his fiancée, but no details of the selling price were ever revealed. The $16 million price tag is an estimate based on its size and color, but the finished piece could be worth far more when you consider what a rare piece it is. 9. The Moussaieff Red Diamond ($20 million) Diamonds come in many colors, but red ones are particularly rare. According to the Cape Town Diamond Museum there have only been up to maybe only 30 true red diamonds ever found, with most of them being less than half a carat. A farmer in Brazil found the rough stone that was to become the Moussaieff Red Diamond in the 90’s. At a weight of 13.90 carats it immediately became the center of attention. The William Goldberg Diamond Corporation from New York then purchased it, and decided to facet it into a triangular brilliant cut. This process would mean losing 8.79 carats, but the resulting cranberry colored 5.11 carat gem is simply stunning. It was originally named the Red Shield, but was renamed by the Moussaieff Jewelers when they purchased it for about $8 million at the turn of the century. This diamond has regularly been to exhibitions, being shown alongside other ones in the Smithsonian. Were it to be sold, it would be expected to cost at least $20 million. 8. The Perfect Pink ($23 million) When it sold for $23 million in 2010, the Perfect Pink Diamond was the most expensive jewel that had ever been sold in Asia. It weighs 14.23 carats, is graded as fancy intense pink, and is set in a rose and white gold ring with rectangular shaped diamonds on either side. Pure Pink diamonds of more than 10 carats are very unusual, with only 18 examples having gone to auction in the past 244 years; none of which was classified as intense pink at the time of sale. This makes the Perfect Pink a truly unique piece, and explains why it sold for ten million dollars more than had been expected. 7. The Wittelsbach Diamond ($23.4 million) The first records of the Wittelsbach Diamond come from back in the 17th century when it was sold to Louis XIV of France. It has a rare blue color, and weighs 35.56 carats. The stone has a royal history, having been passed down through families since the 1600’s. It went from France, to Spain, and over to Germany, where it accompanied the German King Louis III to his burial place in 1921. At some point in the 30’s it was sold off to raise money for the German government, and from here things get mysterious. No one seemed to know who had bought it, and it somehow got replaced with a piece of blue glass in the museum. Rumors of the actual diamond changing hands were rife in the following decades, until 1962 when it reappeared at a jewelery store in Belgium. It was sold in 2008 for $23.4 million and, to the dismay of diamond historians, the new owner decided that it should be recut, since it had originally been done in the early 1600’s. The resulting stone, now 21.06 carats, meant that both the color and quality were vastly improved, and the estimated price went through the roof.

Henry Sapiecha

www.www-gems.com

Now There Are Near-Perfect Copies of the Hope Diamond

Scientists created cubic zirconia replicas of the historic gem’s previous forms—the original brought from India and the famous “French Blue”

The Hope Diamond that famously resides at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. has long been known for its inimitable color—a deep, steely blue, shifting ever-so-slightly in the light. It’s a hue that replica makers have tried and failed to copy; curator Jeffrey Post says the color attempt is always “garishly awful,” an aquamarine blue or a sickly “Windex blue.”

The true color is a trick of the light, thanks in part to the gemstone’s unique blue color and cut. It hasn’t always looked this way, either. When Jean Baptiste Tavernier first sold the original 112-carat diamond from India to King Louis XIV in 1668, it was crudely cut and a lighter color. Tavernier called it “un beau violet” (a beautiful violet). It would become bluer and darker as the gem passed through different hands, both French and American, and was recut twice more.

For the first time, scientists have created near-perfect cubic zirconia replicas of the diamond in its previous forms: the original brought from India, King Louis XIV’s “French Blue” and the current version encased in a Cartier pendant. It’s a project that’s taken a decade to perfect, involving cross-Atlantic collaborations between the Smithsonian, the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris and the gem-cutter John Hatleberg.

“We’ve been able to use a modern technology to bring back from history a diamond that no one has seen since 1792,” said Post at an October press conference. “We are actually putting ourselves back in the eyes of King Louis XIV and seeing what he saw.”

When the famous blue diamond first joined Louis XIV’s crown jewels in 1668, it was a lot bigger and flatter than it was today. It was cut in the Mughal style, with a large, flat base and top to match. Because there weren’t as many facets—the small flat faces on a crystal surface—to reflect light internally, it was a much lighter blue. “It’s like looking through a window,” Post said, holding the replica up to a lamp.

 
A computer simulation of how the Hope Diamond likely appeared when it was owned by King Louis XIV of France. (Image by François Farges)

The gem became much darker and smaller once the court jeweler got his hands on it. It was cut with more facits and shrunk to 69 carats. It was then that it became known as the “French Blue,” said François Farges of the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and it perfectly matched Louis XIV’s sensibility.

“Think of the garden at the Castle of Versailles with the straight lines, perfectly well-arranged symmetry, good angles,” Farges said. “It is the same inspiration you have in the French Blue.”

It was cut precisely but unusually, with a small eye in the middle that let light pass clear through. This was done intentionally, as Farges and Post proposed in a 2014 paper. According to the crown jewels inventory, the diamond was set into gold and mounted on a stick. Farges found that, when placed in a gold setting via a computer model, the center of the diamond would look like a golden sun—the symbol of Louis XIV, “the sun king.” It’s even more impressive, Farges said, if you consider that the blue of the diamond and the gold of the sun represented the French monarchy.

Now, Post could hold up a replica of the French Blue placed in a facsimile of its gold setting and show the faint golden sun-like shape in the middle. Farges said that historical records suggest Louis XIV would have pulled the jewel from a gold chest and proudly displayed the stick for important visitors; it was meant to be observed, not worn.

“The big message was that France was so rich that they could use all those diamonds at any time to build a huge army in case the country would be invaded,” Farges said. “It was really a political instrument just to serve the glory of the king against the foreign kingdoms.”

All of these details about the diamond’s journey, color, faceting and use wouldn’t have been discovered without historical records like Tavierner’s drawings in his journal and those Farges has studied at the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle.

Farges said he stumbled upon one of the most important records about the diamond by accident. He was looking through the drawers of diamonds in the national gem collection and found a lead cast. He was puzzled by its shape, which didn’t resemble any type of diamond he had seen before, so he spent the night doing research. To his surprise, he found that it was the lead cast for the French Blue.

“I came to the conclusion that it was the only replica, the only historical replica known to date of a French blue diamond, that we thought was completely lost. It’s not totally lost,” Farges said. “For the first time, we had the model in 3D that was perfectly accurate, with all of the facetings.”

Before creating the older versions of the diamond, Hatleberg set out to make a replica of the current version of the Hope. Almost 30 years ago, Post took the Hope out of its pendant setting and gave it to Hatleberg so he could make a silicone mold and then a resin epoxy cast. From there, he cut cubic zirconia to match the cast, and then brought several of the copies to a company in Minnesota to add the coloring.

To replicate the color, the company used a method called precious metal nanodot vapor deposition. They take a colorless stone and thinly coat it with metal atoms, making tiny adjustments to ever-so-slightly tweak the color. This technology wasn’t available even five years ago, Hatleberg said.

Hatleberg would then come to Post and Farges with copies coated with different colors. “We’d go, ‘A little too dark, too light, too green, too blue, too purple,’” Post said. “And after literally years of doing that, dozens of trips back and forth, we finally ended up with a stone that all of us here, all of us who know the Hope Diamond, looked at and said, ‘We can’t tell the difference.’”

The replica might look exactly the same as the original Hope Diamond, but aspiring jewel thieves or counterfeiters, beware; there’s no way that you could slip a fake past an expert. Under an ultraviolet light in a dark room, the Hope Diamond phosphoresces, Post says, glowing orange for about a minute or so. He can use a spectrometer to measure the light spectrum, which differs from diamond to diamond like a fingerprint, he says.

It’s unclear when visitors will be able to look at the replicas in real life, but Post says he hopes the stones will be on display at the Natural History Museum within the next year or two. There will also be a set of replicas that travel around the country out on loan, and a set for the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle.

In the meantime, Post said, he hopes to study the Hope’s history even further with Hatleberg and Farges. “It’s such an interesting diamond, both scientifically and historically,” Post said. “We know we’re going to keep learning from it. We’ve only begun to learn all of its secrets.”

Henry Sapiecha

Alrosa prepared to now auction the most expensive diamond ever polished in Russia

Part of its “Dynasty collection,” consisting in five diamonds polished from a 179-carat rock found in 2015

Russian miner Alrosa  (MCX:ALRS), the world’s top diamond producer by output will auction Wednesday a rare collection of diamonds produced domestically, including the most expensive rock ever polished in the country — a giant 51.4-carat gem.

More than 130 potential buyers have already registered to participate in tomorrow’s online sale of the diamond collection, named after the dynasties of the Romanov, the company said in a statement. That family ruled for more than 300 years before the Russian Revolution.

The largest of all bears the same name as the entire Dynasty collection. It’s a huge, traditional round-cut diamond, whose 2.5 cm (1 inch) diameter is equal in size to the visible part of a human eye.

The five diamonds. (Photo: Alrosa)

Discovered in 2015, the rough version of the diamond was a massive 179-carat gem, found in a mine in the northeast region of Sakha. It was then cut and polished into five smaller gems, named after noble families of the imperial era: Sheremetyev, Orlov, Vorontsov and Usupov.

“There was a good reason to choose the name for the collection, which is connected with Alrosa’s intention to revive the traditions and memory of renowned Russian jewelers famous for their craftsmanship and filigree since Russia’s first cutting and polishing factory founded by Peter I (the Great) early in the 18th century,” the company said.

The 179-carat rough diamond that was the source of the Dynasty collection. (Photo: Alrosa)

According to Alrosa, the Dynasty diamond is potentially the most expensive diamond manufactured in the history of Russian jewellery because of its quality.

Alrosa’s decision to produce these polished diamonds and sell them online fits with a broader industry quest to find new ways to the market and add value on the part of gem producers.

Alrosa and Anglo American’s De Beers unit, which for the first time auctioned polished stones this year, produce about half of the world’s rough diamonds.

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Henry Sapiecha

World’s ‘most beautiful diamond’ to go under the hammer at Christies Auction House

Diamond necklace featuring 163-carat flawless emerald stone, largest of its kind ever to be put up for an auction, has been unveiled in Hong Kong on Thursday September 28 (PRNewsfoto/de GRISOGONO)

An impressive flawless 163-carat diamond that has been hailed the “world’s most beautiful” will go under Christie’s hammer in Geneva in November, the auction house said Thursday.

Discovered in February last year in eastern Angola, the 404.20-carat rough diamond — named the “4 de Fevereiro” — was also the largest found so far in the southern African country, Christie’s said.

www.gem-creations.com

Diamond necklace featuring 163-carat flawless emerald stone, largest of its kind ever to be put up for an auction, has been unveiled in Hong Kong on Thursday September 28 (PRNewsfoto/de GRISOGONO)

A team of ten diamond-cutting specialist were involved polishing the rough diamond during the period of 11 months. The stone was then designed into a one-of-a-kind piece by Swiss jewellery house de Grisogono.

The D-color, emerald-cut diamond is classified as a rare Type IIa one, which in technical terms means an almost complete absence of nitrogen in the stone, de Grisogono said in a separate statement.

The original, 404.20-carat rough diamond that was mined in eastern Angola — the 27th largest rough white diamond ever discovered. (Image courtesy of Christie’s.)

It took over 1,700 hours to create this unique jewel and involved a team of 14 craftsmen and their know-how as well as love for perfection for each detail in the necklace.

he D-color, emerald-cut diamond can be detached from its white gold, diamond and emerald necklace. (Image courtesy of Christie’s.)

The finished piece, named The Art of de Grisogono, allows customers to detach it from its white gold, diamond and emerald necklace, if they wish to do so. It will be shown in London, Dubai and New York before going to auction in Geneva on November 14.

www.www-gems.com

Henry Sapiecha

Lucara gets almost $18M for fragment of its massive ‘Lesedi La Rona’ diamond

Canada’s Lucara Diamond (TSX:LUC), the company that hit the jackpot in 2015 after finding the world’s second-largest diamond, just got $17.5 million for a piece that broke from that rock, the now historic 1,109-carat “Lesedi La Rona.”

To date, Lucara has sold 145 diamonds for more than $1 million each.The 373.7-carat diamond, sold during the Vancouver-based miner’s $54.8 million recent tender to luxury jeweller Graff Diamonds, was one of 15 large and high value rocks offered by the company.

Just like the 1,109-carat diamond it found in 2015, all the stones sold this week were mined at Lucara’s Karowe mine in Botswana, which has been yielding massive rocks as of late.

Last year, the miner sold one of those mammoths — the 813-carat “The Constellation” — for $63 million, setting a new record for a rough gem.

It wasn’t that lucky when it came to three-billion-year-old “Lesedi La Rona,” meaning “our light” in the Tswana language spoken in Botswana, as the rock failed to sell at a Sotheby’s auction in June last year.

This is the 373.72-carat rock, once part of the second largest gem quality diamond ever discovered. (Image courtesy of Graff Diamonds.)

The gem, second in size only to the Cullinan diamond in the British Crown jewels, was expected to go for at least $70 million. The highest bid, however, was around $61 million, leaving it in Lucara’s hands.

To date, the company has sold 145 diamonds for more than $1 million each, bringing in revenues of more than $528 million, its President and CEO William Lamb said in the statement.

Botswana, the focus of Lucara, is the world’s largest producer of diamonds and the trade has transformed it into a middle-income nation.

Henry Sapiecha

Decadent Diamonds from Sotheby’s Auction House

This spring, Sotheby’s presents the ultimate in coloured diamonds: Apollo and Artemis comprised of a blue diamond weighing 14.54 carats, internally flawless, type IIb, and a pink diamond weighing 16.00 carats, VVS2 clarity, type IIa. The stones are currently mounted as a spectacular pair of earrings, but are being offered separately, on account of their extreme rarity, power and presence. They are, says David Bennett, Worldwide Chairman of Sotheby’s International Jewellery Division, “by far the most important pair of earrings ever offered at auction.”

pink-blue teardrop dimond earrings image www.worldwidediamonds.info

The Apollo and Artemis Diamonds. Exceptional fancy vivid blue diamond. Estimate CHF38,125,000–50,160,000 ($38,000,000–50,000,000). Important fancy intense pink diamond. Estimate CHF12,545,000–18,060,000 ($12,500,000–18,000,000). To be offered in Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels on 16 May in Geneva.

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The CTF Pink Star. Sold for HK$553,037,500 ($71,200,000).

PINK-STAR-DIAMOND IMAGE www.worldwidediamonds.info

On 4 April 2017 in Hong Kong, Sotheby’s set a new auction record for any diamond or jewel when The Pink Star, a 59.60-carat oval fancy vivid pink internally flawless diamond – the largest Internally Flawless, Fancy Vivid Pink diamond that the GIA has ever graded – sold to renowned jeweller Chow Tai Fook, who has renamed the stone the CTF Pink Star. Not only was the price more than double the previous record for a fancy vivid pink diamond, but it was also a new record for any work ever sold at auction in Asia.

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Rare platinum, fancy vivid green diamond and diamond ring. Estimate $1,000,000–1,500,000. To be offered in Magnificent Jewels, Including the Legendary Stotesbury Emerald on 25 April in New York.

rare-platinum-fancy-vivid-green-diamond-and-diamond-ring.image www.worldwidediamonds.info

In the elite world of fancy coloured diamonds, green and red are by far the rarest body colours. The appearance of green in a diamond is caused by millions of years of exposure to a source of natural irradiation in the earth, either among uranium compounds or percolating groundwater, which changes its specific absorption of light. Our upcoming New York sale presents a cut-cornered square mixed-cut Fancy Vivid Green diamond weighing 1.64 carats, flanked by two cut-cornered triangle-shaped diamonds weighing approximately .65 carats.

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Fancy intense purplish pink diamond ring, Piaget. Estimate CHF78,030,000-12,040,000 ($8,000,000-12,000,000). To be offered in Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels on 16 May in Geneva.

Fancy intense purplish pink diamond ring 7.04 carats image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Another exceptional colourful diamond on offer this spring in Geneva, this ring is set with a modified rectangular brilliant-cut fancy intense purplish pink diamond, weighing 7.04 carats, VS1 Clarity, type IIa, between triangular diamond shoulders.

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Extraordinary pair of platinum and diamond earrings. Estimate $4,500,000–5,500,000. To be offered in Magnificent Jewels, Including the Legendary Stotesbury Emerald on 25 April in New York.

diamond earrings feature two square emerald-cut diamonds, weighing 20.29 and 20.02 carats, topped by two smaller square emerald-cut diamonds weighing 1.01 carats each image www.worldwidediamonds.info

These earrings feature two square emerald-cut diamonds, weighing 20.29 and 20.02 carats, topped by two smaller square emerald-cut diamonds weighing 1.01 carats each.

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The Unique Pink. Sold for CHF30,826,000 ($31,561,200).

unique-pink-diamond-Weighing 15.38 carats, the “Unique Pink image www.wordwidediamonds.info

Weighing 15.38 carats, the “Unique Pink” is a Type IIa brilliant cut diamond with unparallelled saturation. Until this April, when Sotheby’s Hong Kong sold the CTF Pink Star, the largest fancy vivid pink diamond ever offered at auction for a record-setting price, the Unique Pink held the world auction record for any fancy vivid pink diamond. It also contributed to the May 2016 Geneva sale of Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels sale becoming the new world record for any jewellery auction.

De Beers Millennium Jewel 4. Sold for HK$248,280,000 ($32,013,223).

De Beers Millennium 10.10 carat blue diamond image www.worldwid3ediamonds.info

To celebrate the Millennium in 2000, De Beers, together with The Steinmetz Group, showcased an exceptional collection of eleven important blue diamonds, the De Beers Millennium Jewels, in a specially designed exhibit at London’s Millennium Dome. Offered for sale from an Asian private collection, this rare and internally flawless 10.10-carat blue diamond is the largest oval-shaped fancy vivid blue diamond ever to appear at auction and was the most expensive diamond ever sold in Hong Kong before the CTF Pink Star in April 2017.

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The Graff Pink. Sold for CHF45,442,500 ($46,158,674).

The Graff Pink diamond 24.78 carats image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Type IIa pink diamonds are very rare in nature, but this fancy intense pink round-cornered rectangular step-cut diamond weighing 24.78 carats, set between shield-shaped diamond shoulders, is a perfect, pure pink colour, which has been graded “fancy intense pink” by the GIA with no secondary colour modifier. Adding to this diamond’s exquisite nature is its classic emerald cut – a style most associated with white diamonds – that is immensely sought-after in rare colours. According to the consignor, the stone had not appeared on the open market since it was first purchased some 65 years ago from Harry Winston himself. In 2010, Laurence Graff bought the diamond and renamed it The Graff Pink.

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Magnificent oval diamond 118.28 carat, D colour, flawless, type IIA. Sold for HK$238,680,000 ($30,782,560).

Magnificent oval diamond 118.28 carat, D colour, flawless, type IIA image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Unearthed in 2011 from the deep mines in Southern Africa, the 299-carat rough of this oval diamond is one of the largest and most beautiful diamond roughs found in recent years. Carefully and meticulously worked over months, the unrefined stone was transformed into a mesmerising 118.28-carat unmounted, brilliant-cut diamond. When sold at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in 2013, it became the world record for any white diamond at auction, as well as the biggest diamond ever sold at auction.

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The Lady Dalal. Sold for CHF11,282,500 ($12,361,558).

The Lady Dalal 110.03 carat yellow diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Polished diamonds over 100 carats of any colour, weak or strong, are rare, which makes this 110.03-carat yellow diamond all the more impressive. The Sun-Drop, the largest known fancy vivid yellow pear-shaped diamond, was unveiled to the world at London’s Natural History Museum where it was exhibited in the famous Vault Gallery in 2011. After being sold at Sotheby’s Geneva the same year, it was renamed The Lady Dalal.

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The Blue Moon of Josephine. Sold for CHF48,634,000 ($48,468,158).

The Blue Moon of Josephine 12.03 carats vivid blue diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Smashing all records, the Blue Moon Diamond, renamed The Blue Moon of Josephine, sold in November 2015 at Sotheby’s Geneva for over $4 million per carat – the world auction price-per-carat record for a diamond or gemstone. “After seeing the stone’s colour and understanding its significance, it was fitting to name it the Blue Moon Diamond,” noted Suzette Gomes, CEO of Cora International. “Not only its shape is reminiscent of a full moon,” she said of the cushion-shaped fancy vivid blue 12.03-carat diamond, “but the metaphor for the expression is exactly what one could say about the occurrence and existence of such a gemstone.”

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A spectacular emerald-cut diamond. Sold for $22,090,000.

emerald-cut diamond 110.20 carat white diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Only six perfect diamonds weighing over 100 carats have sold at auction in the last 25 years. Sotheby’s sold five of those spectacular stones at sales in Geneva, Hong Kong, and New York, where in April 2015, this jaw-dropping 100.20-carat, type IIa diamond was offered. The classic, emerald-cut diamond’s D colour and internally flawless clarity are exceptionally rare at this scale.

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Superb and highly important fancy vivid purple-pink diamond and diamond ring, mounted by Sotheby’s Diamonds. Sold for HK$137,880,000 ($17,778,247).

fancy vivid purple-pink diamond and diamond ring 8.41 carats pear shaped image www.worldwidediamonds.info

This ring centres an 8.41-carat, pear-shaped, type IIa pink diamond, shown here, which is prized not only for its sweet, intensely saturated hue, but also for its internally flawless clarity. With a stylised mount pavé-set throughout with circular-cut diamonds, this jewel sold at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in 2014.

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The Beau Sancy. Sold for CHF9,042,500 ($9,678,188).

The Beau Sancy 34.98 carat double rose cut diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Before this 34.98-carat modified pear double rose-cut diamond sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in 2012, its first royal owner was Marie de Medici, the wealthiest heiress in Europe, who in 1600 married Henri IV, considered the greatest king ever to rule France. Descending from the Medici through her father, Francesco, Grand Duke of Tuscany, who gave her this gem, she was not only rich but very grand. Cut and polished towards the end of the 16th century, the Beau Sancy also exhibits the first attempts to liberate the “fire” inherent in the stone – a property of diamond so admired today

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The Zoe Diamond. Sold for $32,645,000.

zoe diamond magnificent and rare 9.75-carat fancy vivid blue diamond pendant image www.worldwidediamonds.info

In the November 2014 sale of the Collection of Mrs Paul Mellon, collectors eagerly vied for jewellery and objects of vertu that evoked her celebrated style. After 20 minutes of competitive bidding, Mrs Mellon’s magnificent and rare 9.75-carat fancy vivid blue diamond pendant sold for more than double its high estimate, driving the 98%-sold auction total to $218 million. It was renamed The Zoe Diamond.

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Magnificent diamond. Sold for CHF12,597,000 ($14,201,354).

70.33-carat cushion brilliant white diamond image www.wordwidediamonds.info

Introduced at the beginning of the 20th century, the modern cushion-cut derives from ancient cushion-cut diamonds, sometimes referred to as “old mine” cuts. This magnificent 70.33-carat cushion brilliant diamond has not only received the highest colour and clarity grade from the GIA for white diamonds – D colour and flawless clarity – but it also is a type IIa diamond.

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The Graff Vivid Yellow. Sold for CHF14,501,000 ($16,347,847).

The Graff Vivid Yellow 100.09 carat diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Of exceptional beauty and extraordinary fire, this brilliant gem is one of the largest fancy vivid yellow diamonds in the world. It is listed in Ian Balfour’s book Famous Diamonds as one of the few rare yellow diamonds greater than 100 carats. The 100.09-carat brilliant fancy vivid yellow diamond, which can also be detached and worn as a pendant, was sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in 2014.

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‘The Historic Pink’ magnificent fancy vivid pink diamond ring. Sold for CHF14,810,000 ($15,903,422).

'The Historic Pink' magnificent fancy vivid pink diamond ring. 8.72 carats image www.worldwidediamonds.info

This exceptional vivid pink Type IIa diamond, formerly in the collection of American heiress Huguette Clark, was mounted as a ring by Dreicer. Set with a cushion brilliant-cut fancy vivid pink diamond weighing 8.72 carats, this ring sold most recently in 2014 at Sotheby’s Geneva.

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Exceptional pear-shaped diamond. Sold for $14,165,000.

Exceptional pear-shaped white diamond 74.79 carats image www.worldwidediamonds.info

At 74.79 carats, this unmounted type IIa diamond has it all: D colour, VVS1 clarity, and it is potentially internally flawless.

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Henry Sapiecha

World’s largest pair of pear-shaped diamonds could fetch up to $30m

worlds-largest-pair-of-pear-shaped-diamond-earrings-could-fetch-up-to-30m image www.worldwidediamonds.info

A newly created set of drop earrings featuring the world’s largest pair of pear-shaped diamonds, is expected to fetch up to $30 million when they go under Christie’s hammer in Geneva on Nov. 15.

The “flawless quality” rocks, weighing 52.55 and 50.47 carats, were made into earrings by Boehmer et Bassenge’s new boutique Maison de Haute Joaillerie, in Paris.

The piece of jewellery, named Miroir de l’Amour (Mirror of Love), will be sold alongside an exceedingly rare Fancy Vivid pink pear-shaped diamond ring, which is expected to sale for $16 to $18 million, the auction house said.

the-fancy-vivid-pink diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

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The Orange

the-orange

When it was auctioned in 2013, this diamond was the largest Fancy Vivid Orange diamond ever to have been discovered, weighing approximately 14.82 carats.

The gem, which sold for over $35.5 million — more than $15m above its high estimate — is also the largest Fancy Vivid Orange diamond ever graded by the Gemological Institute of America.

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The Winston Legacy

the-winston-legacy diamond image www.worldwidediamonds.info

On 15 May 2013 this exceptional pear-shaped gem — at 101.73 carats, one of the world’s most perfect diamonds — was the top lot in Christie’s record-breaking $102 million Geneva auction of Magnificent Jewels. It sold to Harry Winston for $26.7 million, setting a new world record at auction for a colourless diamond.

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The Blue

the-blue diamond www.worldwidediamonds.info

The world’s largest and flawless pear-shaped diamond set a fresh all-time record at a global auction for a blue diamond. It was sold to Harry Winston for $24 million — more than $1.8 million per carat — and it was rechristened as the Winston Blue.

The diamond industry has rebounded this year after Anglo America’s De Beers unit and Russian rival Alrosa axed supply in 2015. And while rough-diamond prices have gained over 7% this year, main actors such as De Beers have repeatedly warned the final months of the year could be more difficult.

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Henry Sapiecha

India says the famous blue Kohinoor diamond belongs to England

india-says-kohinoor-diamond-belongs-to-britain-image www.worldwidediamonds.info

India’s government has told the country’s top court it won’t try to reclaim the 105-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.

Kohinoor, one of the world’s largest diamonds, has been at the centre of a diplomatic row between New Delhi and London, with India arguing for decades that it should get it back.

Kohinoor has been part of the British crown jewels for more than 150 years.But the government headed by Narendra Modi told the Supreme Court on Monday that Kohinoor was neither “forcibly taken nor stolen” by the British during colonial times, BBC reports.

The court said it’d take its time to make a decision as the verdict could “stand in the way” of future attempts to bring back items that once belonged to India.

Kohinoor has been part of the British crown jewels for more than 150 years and today forms part of a crown that was worn by the late mother of Queen Elizabeth, currently on display in the Tower of London,.

For many Indians, returning the diamond would be symbolic of India’s subjugation and a compensation for the excesses of the British during their colonial rule.

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Henry Sapiecha

Shirley Temple’s fancy vivid blue 9.54 ct diamond ring fails to sell at auction

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A rare 9.54-carat blue diamond ring that belonged to former child star Shirley Temple has failed to buy a buyer at a touted Sotheby’s auction in New York.

The ring, flush in its original Art Deco setting, was originally expected to bring between $25 million and $35 million.

In the last two months, Sotheby’s heavily promoted the ring, exhibiting it at its bureaus in Hong Kong and Los Angeles and taking it on a major media tour.

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The Fancy Deep Blue diamond ring was expected to fetch up to $35 million. (Image courtesy of Sotheby’s)

The Hollywood actress’ father gave her the jewel in 1940, around the time of her 12th birthday and when the girl’s film “The Blue Bird” premiered. Temple’s father paid $7,210 for the ring, the auction house said last month.

Despite its history and rarity — the rock is, after all, fancy deep blue — the ring remains in Sotheby’s hands.

Depending on the lot’s consigner’s preferences, the ring could be recalled, considered for a private sale orchestrated by the auction house, or saved for a future public sale.

Last year, Sotheby’s set a fresh world auction record for any diamond or gemstone ― as well as a record price-per-carat for any diamond or gemstone ― when a 12.03-carat Fancy Vivid Blue diamond sold for $48.5 million.

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Henry Sapiecha

De Beers blue diamond smashes sales records in Asia, fetches almost $32M at auction

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The “De Beers Millennium Jewel 4” may not have the catchiest name in the history of famous diamonds, but the very rare 10.10-carat blue gem has just broke all auction records in Asia, as it fetched almost $32 million.

The rock, the largest oval fancy vivid blue diamond to ever appear at auction, was auctioned off by Sotheby’s in Hong Kong as part of a high profile gem sale.

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The internally flawless diamond was part of the Millennium Jewels collection, unveiled by De Beers in 2000 to commemorate the turn of the century, and displayed at London’s Millennium Dome.

At the time, the blue gem was the target of an attempted multi-million pound robbery in November 2000, which was foiled by the Metropolitan Police.

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The auction house will sell another coveted blue diamond, set in a ring once owned by former child star Shirley Temple, on April 19, in the U.S.

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Henry Sapiecha