Category Archives: MAN MADE DIAMONDS

Diamond Services reports a lowering threshold for synthetic diamonds, as man-made stones as small as 0.0025 cts. discovered in New York

Barely visible on the electronic scale, these tiny single-cut diamonds were discovered by Diamond Services to be laboratory grown.

HONG KONG: JULY 11, 2017 – Multiple single-cut diamonds, sized from a quarter point to half a point (0.0025-0.005 carats), which were contained in jewellery recently submitted for testing to a Diamond Services laboratory, have been found to be synthetic, greatly expanding the range of goods that can be considered at risk of improper and deceptive disclosure.

The jewellery in question was originally submitted to Diamond Services’ laboratory in New York, and after several stones were detected as being potentially laboratory grown. Due to their size, the owner agreed that 11 of them set in eight rings, ranging in size from 0.0025 carats to 0.005 carats, could be removed and sent for full analysis at Diamond Services’ facility in Hong Kong. There they were examined once again with Diamond Services’ award-winning DiamaTest system, which ratified that the diamonds were synthetic, and these findings were confirmed by examination with the DiamondView system of De Beers’ International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR) and Diamond Services Mini Raman Spectrometer.

Usually restricted to smaller-sized stones, single-cut diamonds typically have 17 or 18 facets, and some as few as 16, compared to the standard brilliant round cuts, which are made up of the 57 or 58 facets. Most round stones are first polished as single cuts, and then the additional facets are added. But when small stones are concerned, they are left as single cuts.

“To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that a synthetic single-cut stone has been detected mounted in jewelry, and it is a credit to our Diamond Services procedures and set of equipment,” said Jospeh Kuzi, Diamond Services founder and managing director. “What this means is that almost no diamond can be taken at face value.”

The source of the single-cut synthetics is not immediately apparent, but Kuzi noted that the growing availability of CVD man-made diamond may prove to be a factor. “CVD is being widely in areas outside the diamond industry, and now includes diamond wafers being gown in laboratories for use in the electronics industry. It could be that waste from these labs and factories end up being processed as very small single-cut diamonds for jewellery,” he said.

Diamonds submitted for synthetic screening at Diamond Services facilities are tested using several systems, including the DiamaTest and Mini Raman Spectrometer, both of which was developed by the company. The latter is the only system currently available that can definitely test rough and polished diamonds, both mounted and un-mounted, without the need to refer them for further testing, accurately detecting whether they are HPHT or CVD lab-grown synthetics within seconds.

Diamond Services, which was established in 2012 in Hong Kong, specializes in development of synthetic diamond detection devices. In 2013 it first introduced the DiamaPen®, a hand-held laser device that is able to detect fancy colour synthetic diamonds. In 2014 it introduced DiamaTest®, an innovative system that screens both loose and colourless diamonds for synthetics, for which it won the prestigious JNA 2014 Award. The Mini Raman Spectrometer was introduced to the market in 2015.

Diamond Services synthetic screening services are currently available at the company’s headquarters in Hong Kong (19F Shing Lee Comm. Bldg., 8 Wing Kut St., Central, Hong Kong, tel: +1-852-2536-4555); and in the United States (15W, 47th St., Suite #1404, New York City, tel: +1-844-842-8122).

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Henry Sapiecha

Synthetic diamonds can be used in MRI scan to detect early stage cancers

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Synthetic diamonds can be used in MRI scan

Diamonds are considered as one of nature’s most beautiful inventions, but a new study published in the journal Nature Communications reveals these precious gems they are much more valuable than that, able to help detect early stage cancer.

An Australian research team led by Ewa Rej from University of Sydney discovered a method to use synthetic diamonds in MRI scans to identify cancerous tumours before they become life-threatening. “By attaching hyperpolarized diamonds to molecules targeting cancers the technique can allow tracking of the molecules’ movement in the body,” explained Rej.

Researchers already knew nano-diamonds hold non-toxic properties allowing them to deliver drugs during chemotherapy treatments, and decided to focus on hyperpolarizing the small stones so their signal is detectable by an MRI scanner.

“We thought we could build on these non-toxic properties realising that diamonds have magnetic characteristics enabling them to act as beacons in MRIs,” commented David Reilly from the university in an interview to the Business Standard.

MORE HERE >> www.newcures.info

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Henry Sapiecha

Several diamond miners form group to fight synthetics

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Russia’s Alrosa, Anglo American’s De Beers, Rio Tinto, Lucara, Dominion, Petra and Gem Diamonds are joining forces to market their gems and counter threats such as the expansion of synthetic stones.

The group, called the Diamond Producers Association (DPA), will promote diamonds as a luxury item for high-end consumers and highlight the attraction of natural diamonds amid concerns that some consumers may soon begin favouring cheaper synthetic rocks.

The association, which counts with a $6 million yearly budget, claims to be “the first-ever international representative organization to be formed by some of the leading diamond producers,” DPA said in an e-mailed statement.

The freshly formed entity will step into a role once filled by De Beers, which at one point controlled over 80% of the world’s mined diamonds

The freshly formed entity will step into a role once filled by De Beers, which at one point controlled over 80% of the world’s mined diamonds and pioneered the use of diamonds in engagement rings.

Synthetics challenge

Industry sources believe DPA’s key challenges will be to curb entry of undisclosed man-made diamonds into the market. But for diamond analyst, Paul Zimnisky, such task won’t be a challenging one. At least for now:

“The pricing of synthetics is not yet attractive enough to convert the indifferent customer, nor is the product accessible enough for the unwilling e-shopper,” he wrote earlier this month. “Until there is at least one display case devoted to synthetics in the national jewellery chains and department stores, synthetics’ reach may be limited to being just that of a specialty item.”

In the past year, prices for rough diamonds have fallen 13%, affecting miners everywhere and putting extra pressure on the industry’s so-called midstream segment — the companies in China, India, Belgium and elsewhere that buy diamonds from mine operators, then cut and polish the gems for use in jewellery.

De Beers, which is still the world’s leading diamond producer and mines in southern Africa and Canada, failed to sell 30% of the rough diamonds at its March sale. Last month it cut its 2015 output target to 30 million to 32 million carats, from as much as 34 million carats.

South Africa-focused Petra Diamonds (LON:PDL) said in April that sales in the first three months of 2015 dropped 41%, to $96.1 million. The firm attributed the decline in part to problems that wholesalers are having getting credit to purchase rough diamonds

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Henry Sapiecha

HARDEST MAN MADE DIAMONDS EVER MADE NOW REVEALED IN CHINA

hardest-synthetic-diamond-ever-made-image www.worldwidediamonds.info

Chinese researchers from Yanshan University have created a synthetic diamond harder than its natural counterpart and able to withstand even hotter temperatures.

The team, led by Yongjun Tian, say the new form of diamond could be used to make superior cutting or crushing tools, capable of operate under very extreme conditions.

The resulting diamond has an extremely high hardness of around 200GPa and is stable at temperatures up to nearly 1000°C – 200°C higher than natural diamond.

The group made the diamond by heating carbon onions —concentric fullerene spheres nested within one another— at 2000°C and 25GPa, hundreds of thousands of times the pressure of Earth’s atmosphere. The resulting diamond has an extremely high hardness of around 200GPa and is stable at temperatures up to nearly 1000°C – 200°C higher than natural diamond.

“The scientific community has dreamt of synthesising novel materials harder than natural diamond for decades,” says Tian in an article published this week in the journal Nature.

The usual approach, he adds, is to try and create smaller and smaller grains within the material’s microstructure.

Because of its superior features, the synthetic diamond diamond can be use to manufacture industrial tools or scientific instruments —such as diamond anvil cells— that work at high temperatures.

The team is currently working on reducing the pressure needed to make each diamond by using finer carbon onions, so that they can be more easily manufactured.

Henry Sapiecha

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