Category Archives: SPECIAL JEWELLERY

India says the famous blue Kohinoor diamond belongs to England

india-says-kohinoor-diamond-belongs-to-britain-image www.worldwidediamonds.info

India’s government has told the country’s top court it won’t try to reclaim the 105-carat Koh-i-Noor diamond, which is now part of the British crown jewels.

Kohinoor, one of the world’s largest diamonds, has been at the centre of a diplomatic row between New Delhi and London, with India arguing for decades that it should get it back.

Kohinoor has been part of the British crown jewels for more than 150 years.But the government headed by Narendra Modi told the Supreme Court on Monday that Kohinoor was neither “forcibly taken nor stolen” by the British during colonial times, BBC reports.

The court said it’d take its time to make a decision as the verdict could “stand in the way” of future attempts to bring back items that once belonged to India.

Kohinoor has been part of the British crown jewels for more than 150 years and today forms part of a crown that was worn by the late mother of Queen Elizabeth, currently on display in the Tower of London,.

For many Indians, returning the diamond would be symbolic of India’s subjugation and a compensation for the excesses of the British during their colonial rule.

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Henry Sapiecha

Unknown quantity of diamonds stolen from diamond mine in South Africa + Hong Kong Diamond Necklace worth $4.6m

Undisclosed number of diamonds stolen from South African mine

South African police is searching for sixteen men who stole an undisclosed number of diamonds from a mine near Prieska, Northern Cape, at about 3:40 am Monday.

According to Sapa news agency, the gang tied up security guards and two employees and demanded the safe keys.

Since they were unable to access to the safe, they broke into a room used for sorting the diamonds, running away with an undisclosed number of precious gems, the agency reports.

Undisclosed number of diamonds stolen from South African mine

Also in Hong Kong

On Friday, four people — one of them reportedly a girl between 12 and 14 years old — stole a diamond necklace worth more than $4.6 million in Hong Kong.

The three adults posed as “big spenders” to distract the shop’s employees, an unnamed police source told the South China Morning Post. Meanwhile, the girl grabbed a key to open the cabinet containing the necklace, which was 100-carat gold embedded with more than 30 diamonds, the paper’s source said.

Nobody noticed the necklace was gone until way after the group had left the premises, the paper added.

HAVING THE CREMATED ASHES OF YOUR DEAD RELATIVE TURNED INTO A BLUE DIAMOND AFTER GOING INTO A PROCESS OF HEAT & PRESSURE

CREMATED ASH REMAINS OF A LOVED ONE TURNED INTO A DIAMOND

Memorial Diamonds are supposed to be an everlasting keepsake, remembrance, or heirloom to pass to future generations.

diamonds-made-from-human-ashes-the-industry-latest-and-creepiest-fad-image www.worldwidediamonds.info

It surely sounds dark, but for some the possibility of converting the ashes of cremated loved ones into a diamond could truly be a jewel to remember. And that is exactly what Switzerland-based jewellery maker Algordanza has began offering through its so-called memorial diamonds.

As explained in its website, the company uses “Russian technology” to convert the naturally occurring carbon present in human bodies (about 18%) into diamonds.

Using roughly 500 grams of ashes, the firm is able to extract the carbon present in human ashes and use it to form a man-made diamond in a mould under high pressure. The process, which takes about a week, yields mostly blue gems because of certain chemicals in the human body.

Algordanza offers a variety of diamond sizes and cuts that can be placed on a ring or other jewellery pieces. Prices run higher than conventional diamonds, starting from about $3,000 depending on the size and cut.

The resulting diamond will be “an everlasting keepsake, remembrance, or heirloom to pass to future generations,” Frank Ripka, CTO of Algordanza, told Business Insider.

This company is not alone. Chicago-based LifeGem claims to be the original inventor of these kinds of gems, saying it holds the U.S. patent for memorial diamonds.

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Henry Sapiecha

pink diamonds line image www.worldwidediamonds.info

ROYAL BLUE DIAMOND A HUGE 10.06CT BEING OFFERED FOR SALE @ $9.8M BY RAU ANTIQUES

FAMOUS ‘ROYAL BLUE’ DIAMOND BEING OFFERED AT A MEASLY $9.8M

royal blue diamond ring 10.09ct image www.worldwidediamonds.info

A stunning 10.06-carat blue diamond ring, surrounded by pink and white gems on a platinum and rose gold setting, is up for grabs at the M.S. Rau Antiques in New Orleans, US, for “only” US$9.8 million.

The price of this unique rock, called “The Royal Blue,” may seem a bargain when compared to the $19 million Sotheby’s Hong Kong is expecting to fetch for its recently announced 7.59-carat round fancy vivid blue rock.

The cut-corned, modified brilliant cut, natural fancy Royal Blue diamond has a VVS1 clarity grade, which means it has “very, very slight” inclusions, according to an article published by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA).

The diamond, considered by experts the finest blue gem on the market today, is only one step away from being graded as “internally flawless” under the GIA scale.

Blue diamonds rarely go on sale and have been sought-after by royals and celebrities for centuries. When sold, they usually go for record-breaking figures at auctions and other sales.

Because of their beauty and rarity, fancy blue diamonds attract a great deal of attention, and they usually fetch 10 to 50 more than their colourless peers.

The most recent example is the 5.3-carat fancy deep-blue diamond sold last April for $9.5 million at Bonhams’ Fine Jewellery sale in London. That is $1.8 million per carat.

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Henry Sapiecha